Neo-Nazis Try to Take Over Leith, ND; Hundreds Protest

From Indian Country Today

By mid-afternoon on Sunday, September 22,Last Real Indians, reported on its Facebook page, “White supremacists have raised their flag over the town of Leith, ND.”

The news came as hundreds of Native Americans and others flocked to the tiny North Dakota town of Leith, population 24, to protest a group of American neo-Nazis who plan to take over the town and make it “an all-white enclave,” according toPolitical Blindspot.

UnityND, a group that formed in protest to the proposed extremist, neo-Nazi takeover, reported at around 2 p.m. that a caravan of protesters was on its way, including at least 25 cars, a bus and a van. “Plus more coming from the Tribes,” the site tweeted. Live streaming byUnedited Mediashowed what looked like several hundred people participating in the protest that began around 3 p.m.

The neo-Nazi invasion of Leith was announced in theBismarck Tribunein a September 6 story about Craig Cobb, a white supremacist who has been living in Leith for more than a year and has purchased 13 lots, some for as little as $500, including one where he lived. He has been promoting Leith on white supremacist websites as a place where others like him could live, take over the city government and fly Nazi flags, theTribunereported.

Cobb told the Tribune he was grateful for support from Jeff Schoep, “commander” of theNational Socialist Movement(NSM), according to the group’s website. In a video on the website Schoep announces “Our trip to Leith is a gesture of goodwill as we plant the seeds of National Socialism in North Dakota.” Unidentified orchestral music plays softly in the background with the sound of boots marching loudly in the foreground. The website displays the group’s motto – “Putting Family, Race and Nation First while Fighting to Secure American Jobs, Manufacturing & Innovation” – and describes itself as “America’s Premier White Civil Rights Organization – Fighting for White Civil Rights.” Schoep planned to be in Leith September 22-23 on a “fact-finding tour” to protect Cobb’s legal standing in the community and to hold a press conference, theTribunesaid.

Around a dozen armed state troopers dressed in SWAT team gear were on hand. UnityND reported that none of the armed troopers had badge numbers displayed. The protesters gathered around Cobb’s residency where a Nazi flag flew and about a dozen neo-Nazis gathered. The neo-Nazis had strung a banner across his yard that said, “Anti-racist is code for anti-white.”

Various protest speakers took the mike and denounced the neo-Nazis peacefully, but emphatically. “We want the Nazis to know this is not a one day protest. We’ll be watching everything you do.” The protestors chanted, “No Nazis, no KKK!” A World War II Veteran said, “Let these creepy Nazi-Ku Klux people get out.” “Hey, hey! Ho ho! These Nazis have got to go!” the protesters chanted. “Our grandmothers will stand up to you! Our women will take you on!” one speaker said. “This is not your land. This is my land and you can go back home.” “On behalf of everybody here I’d like to say, go home.” “Go home, go home!” the crowd chanted. “Go back to Germany!” one protester said, but another replied that Germany would not have them. “They have laws against Nazis in Germany.” Some of the speakers eloquently rejected the hatred that Nazism represents. “I’m here to tell you we’ve evolved. We do not hate white people. You come here and think you can exploit the ignorance of our own people, you think that we’re going to react out of fear or a place in our hearts that wants to do you harm, but we won’t do that…We are evolved human beings and we think you know you people are a dying cause.”

At around 4 p.m. many of the protesters moved into Leith town hall for the neo-Nazi press conference while bagpipe music played incongruously in the background. When Cobb entered the hall the protesters booed loudly. Many of the protesters left the town hall when one of the neo-Nazis on stage began a speech. Those who remained listened politely. By posting time – three-quarters of an hour later – neo-Nazi was still speaking.

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/09/22/hundreds-protest-attempted-neo-nazi-takeover-leith-nd-151394

White supremacist town showdown in Leith, N.D.

From ABC Chicago

The people of Leith, North Dakota, hoped for a peaceful Sunday night after hundreds came to protest the arrival of white supremacists in the tiny western north Dakota town.

 

The big surprise today? A sea of law enforcement officers who locked down the town and stood between those yelling at each other.

The day started peacefully on the sleepy and Sunday morning in Leith. Farm work ceased hours before any trouble was expected, as the state patrol and deputies from four departments set up a command post and shut down all entrances to Leith. Troopers guarded even the smallest field roads into town.

The proactive plan worked. Shortly after noon, those protesting the presence of white supremacists in Leith arrived, and the unrest began.

A strong showing of support for Leith came from North Dakota’s Native Americans, who came there angry and ready to take on Craig Cobb and members of the National Socialist Movement.

They marched down the main street of Leith, mocking the white supremacists who stood watching from the many lots in town they now own, flags with Nazi swastikas were all over town on land they now own.

What a day for those who have lived in peace and quiet on these dusty town roads for decades. Confrontations broke out, most of it cussing and racial slurs. But always, a strong line of law enforcement separated those preparing to fight.

As things heated up with the protestors, the special response team could be seen approaching the unrest, at the ready.

Bagpiper Jimmy Marr of Oregon, a white supremacist, kicked off the town meeting.

There were few answers as to what will happen to those white supremacists living in Leith. Some got unruly and were removed. As Cobb and his followers left the town hall meeting, they were heckled and jeered. Then yelling from protestors. Close enough law enforcement moved them all back to avoid more confrontation.

Finally, the sheriff sent them all home, Bobby Harper, the only black man in Grant County, lives right behind the white power supporters, and said he couldn’t believe the show of support.

Bagpipes from the white supremacists bid them all farewell, Cobb seeming to enjoy the attention.

By nightfall, everyone had left Leith, the mayor hopeful of one thing – getting his town back.

Protesters in North Dakota rally against white nationalists

From Al Jazeera America

Protesters traveled to the town of Leith, North Dakota yesterday to air their grievances against white nationalists trying to turn the town of 24 into an “all-white enclave.” The demonstration group, UnityND, was formed in response to current resident Craig Cobb’s plans to change the racial makeup of the city.

In an attempt to gain control of local government through elections, Cobb (pictured below) has been buying vacant lots throughout the city and encouraging other “like-minded” people to join him in Leith. According to reports, Cobb has already transferred property to a former Grand Dragon of the Klu Klux Klan and another to the proprietor of a white nationalist website. Cobb’s supporters and members of UnityND came to a head during a scheduled neo-Nazi press conference held at the town’s City Hall.

Those who attended the demonstrations used social media to share what they saw and heard.

 

North Dakotans protest white supremacist

From the Rapid City Journal

Two angry protesters were hauled out and others walked out of the Leith City Hall, where hundreds more gathered outside the old wooden building in a stand against a white supremacist commander holding a meeting inside.

The atmosphere was tense and confrontational in Leith on Sunday afternoon, when some 350 people traveled by car and bus, mostly to show support for the town of 24, which has been in shock mode since last month when Craig Cobb, an extremist with neo-Nazi views, said he planned to take over the town with others like him.

Cobb has lived in town since last year and quietly bought up 12 other lots he plans to populate with enough people to take over town government.

In the hour before the town hall meeting called by Jeff Schoep of Detroit, commander of the white supremacist group National Socialist Movement, the racially diverse and colorful crowd of protesters staged a rally in a small park across from Cobb’s house.

Chants of “No hate in our state!” and “Go home!” were background to emotional speeches from protest organizers, a veteran, Plains Indians and others.

Someone held a kettle of smoking fragrant sage, which wafted over the scene, peopled by a supremacist bagpiper from Oregon and 14 black-suited state Highway Patrol troopers, with a flutter of racial flags flying in front of Cobb’s house.

A plane circled overhead, uniformed cops were at every entrance and the town was cordoned off to keep people confined to the town’s main street.

“It’s unbelievable,” said Rosella Neher, a white-haired elderly woman who grew up on a farm nearby and came to support her childhood town. “I can’t believe it.”

Scott Garman of Fargo,took a megaphone to holler, “This is not a one-time, one-day thing.

“We will be here again and again until you are gone. This is where we stop them. This is where it ends, in that crappy white house across the street,” Garman said, pointing to Cobb’s house where he lives without running water or a flush toilet.

A veteran took the megaphone to call out, “Creepy Nazis, Ku Kluxers, get the hell out of here!”

Chase Iron Horse, of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, yelled to Cobb, “If you think you can come 30 miles from our border and threaten our children, you’ve got another thing coming. We’re just the mouthpieces. The warriors are not even here.” During the protest, Schoep stood in front of Cobb’s house, surrounded by a few burly, shaved-headed men dressed in black, and one woman with multiple nose piercings.

Schoep said the people across the street were of no account to him: “These are outside agitators, some Reds from Minneapolis, and you’ll never see them again.” He said he was proud of Cobb’s work in Leith and said with enough followers, “then we’re in charge of city government. We have to start somewhere and then we can spread out from here.”

A takeover of Grant County government and seats in the Legislature are possible next steps, he said.

Schoep said he’s not a white supremacist, but is a believer in white civil rights and that he was in North Dakota to protect Cobb’s civil rights. He wouldn’t say how long he would be in North Dakota, where he was staying, or what he planned to do besides hold the town meeting.

He did say he now has the deed to the dilapidated building adjacent to Cobb’s lot.

During the meeting, many had questions about his movement and the swastika flag displayed in front of the city hall, a historic building where people used to hold weddings and go rollerskating.

One man in the audience came up to the front and confronted Schoep before being hauled to the back of the room by Grant County Sheriff Steve Bay and deputies.

“The people of Leith do not want your …… here,” said James Testemary, a Lakota from Rapid City, S.D.

Schoep suggested Testemary should sober up.

“You’re stumbling, and obviously drunk. Have you been drinking?” he asked.

“Zero,” Testemary replied.

Schoep said he was surprised to see Native Americans at the protest and said it was the first time he’d seen them at a rally anywhere in the country.

“You have your sovereign land and your own nation. Why is it wrong for us to have our sovereign land?” he asked.

“People don’t want you here. How can you be so cruel, so hateful, that I don’t understand,” Testemary said before he was moved out of the room by police.

Melissa Nicole Hite, now of Elgin, asked Schoep, “What happens to us if we’re not pure white? Will I be exiled from Grant County if I’m not pure white?”

Schoep replied, “We’re not talking about exiling anybody. We do not advocate genocide. If anything, whites are being genocided.”

Afterward, the crowd reassembled in front of Cobb’s, with some loudly asking him to leave peacefully.

“You’ve made a mistake, but you can leave. We forgive you,” one woman called out.

Sheriff Bay said he believed the event was handled well and that the 300-350 people in town were about the size crowd he expected. He handled the situation quietly but purposefully and Schoep’s black-clothed men were told that police — not them — would handle any agitators.

Leith Mayor Ryan Schock didn’t attend Schoep’s town hall meeting though he was out on the street.

“They’re going to have their meeting and I hope that no one supports them,” he said.

The mayor said he was grateful for the strong police presence and the people who came to stand with Leith against the white supremacists.

“The message is that they are behind us. No one will put up with them,” Schock said.

The mayor said Sunday he doesn’t support a proposal to disband the local government and turn control over to the county.

“Not for this,” he said, suggesting maybe for something else.

Cobb was escorted to his house across from city hall after the meeting and said the protesters were there to impede his freedom.

“They’re loud, so what? They’re literally not human to me,” he said. “I feel good.”

One Leith resident, Bobby Harper, the town’s only black resident, didn’t go inside the town hall. He stood on the street observing and said he appreciated the support.

“Hate is not good for nobody,” he said. “This is not going to spread.”

Protesters against White Supremacists arrive In Leith

From WDAZ

The people of Leith, North Dakota are hoping for a peaceful night after hundreds arrived today to protest the arrival of white supremacists in the tiny western north Dakota town. The big surprise today? A sea of law enforcement officers who locked down the town and stood between those yelling at each other.

Clearly the strong showing of the state patrol and various county sheriff’s department sent a message immediately to the white supremacists and those coming to protest them. You get violent, you go to jail.

The day started peacefully on this sleepy town and Sunday morning in Leith. Farm work ceased and in the town of Leith a surprise for everyone.

Steve Bay- Grant County Sheriff: “If we need to take a hold of the situation we will.”

Hours before any trouble was expected, the state patrol and deputies from four departments set up a command post, and shut down all entrances to Leith.

Troopers guarded even the smallest field roads into town.

Ryan Schock- Leith Mayor: “We’ve got to keep control of it a little bit”

The proactive plan worked. Shortly after noon, those protesting the presence of white supremacists in Leith arrived, and the unrest began.

Chase Iron Eyes – Came To protest white supremacists: “The last thing I want to do is be out in physical confrontation with low brows whose intelligence I can’t trust.”

A strong showing of support for Leith coming from North Dakota’s Native Americans. Who came here angry and ready to take on Craig Cobb and members of the National Socialist Movement.

They marched down the main street of Leith, mocking the white supremacists who stood watching from the many lots in town they now own.

Flags with Nazi swastikas were all over town on land they now own.

What a day for those who have live in peace and quiet on these dusty town roads for decades.

Local Leith Resident: “Well I didn’t think that anything like that would happen here.”

Confrontations broke out, most of it cussing and racial slurs. But always, a strong line of law enforcement separated those preparing to fight.

In fact, as things heated up with the protestors, the special response team could be seen approaching the unrest, at the ready.

Bagpiper Jimmy Marr of Oregon is a white supremacist, he kicked off the town meeting.

Jimmy Marr- Member of National Socialist Movement: “Anti-racist is a code word for anti-white.”

A lot of questions but few answers as to what will happen to those white supremacists living in Leith.

Some got unruly and were removed.

As Cobb and his followers left the town hall meeting, they were heckled and jeered.

Then, yelling from protestors. Close enough law enforcement moved them all back to avoid more confrontation.

Finally the sheriff sent them all home, Bobby Harper, the only black in Grant County, living right behind the white power supporters, couldn’t believe the show of support.

Bobby Harper-Leith Resident:“It was good. It was real good.”

Bagpipes from the white supremacists bid them all farewell. Cobb seeming to enjoy the attention.

By night fall, everyone had left Leith,

The mayor now hopeful of one thing. Getting his town back.

– See more at: http://www.wdaz.com/event/article/id/19882/#sthash.MRB3yOB4.dpuf

Hundreds protest in Leith, ND

From KFGO

A tense situation as hundreds packed the tiny town of Leith, North Dakota Sunday to protest the visit of the national leader of a neo-Nazi group.

Jeff Schoep, Commander of the National Socialist movement held a town hall meeting to support Craig Cobb.

Cobb started buying up property in Leith in hopes of developing a white supremacist community.

Schoep, who claims his pro-white group is the largest in the country, wants to make sure Cobb isn’t forced out of town.

There’s a new twist to the story.

Cobb’s house in Leith has been found unfit for human habitation, and the state Health Department could consider condemning the house.

Cobb says if that happens, he will fight it in court.

Neo-Nazi Plans To Run North Dakota Town Decried By Protesters

From the Huffington Post

Hundreds of demonstrators turned out in the tiny North Dakota town of Leith on Sunday to protest plans by an American Nazi group to move in and take over the local government.

The loud but peaceful demonstrators, many of them Native Americans from nearby reservations, were on hand for a visit from Jeff Schoep, commander of the National Socialist Movement, and several followers.

The National Socialist Movement is America’s largest neo-Nazi organization, founded in 1974 by former members of the American Nazi Party, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The group hopes to move enough members into Leith – population 17 – to take over the local government.

“We have to start somewhere,” Schoep told Reuters. “So if we start in small towns and spread out from there, it’s sort of a test ground in that sense, where if we’re able to get off the ground here, then we’re able to get off the ground in other places.”

Schoep and his followers were in Leith on Sunday to survey property purchased for them by local resident Craig Cobb, whose yard is adorned with swastika flags.

Local officials oppose the group’s plans.

Leith Mayor Ryan Schock said city officials were discussing the possibility of unincorporating the city and turning it back over to the county to scuttle the hate group’s plans.

“This is a small, quiet town,” Schock said. “Families live around here, and it’s a very close-knit community. I really wish it hadn’t gotten to this point.”

The protesters, shouting slogans like “Go Home” and “No Hate in Our State,” included more than 200 Native Americans from the nearby Standing Rock Reservation, as well as other reservations from North and South Dakota.

Members of the Grant County Sheriff’s Department were joined by deputies from several surrounding counties. More than a dozen North Dakota Highway Patrol officers also turned out in riot gear, but no violence was reported, officials said.

For more than a year, Cobb, a white supremacist activist, has been buying up properties in Leith and inviting his fellow supremacists to move in and set up a “Pioneer Little Europe,” as some supporters have called it, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

In a recent interview with KXMB-TV in Bismarck, Cobb said he had gotten a lot of offers to buy up land from what he termed like-minded people who believe white people should not be punished for wanting to live near each other.

“It’s fine for all these other minorities, but not us,” he said in the televised interview. “If you merely speak about it, you’re going to be defamed in this country.”

Cobb’s plans were revealed in August after the Alabama-based Southern Poverty Law Center published a report detailing his land purchases in Leith, which is located in a county that is 97 percent white.

The center’s report also cited county tax and property records showing that other leading supremacists, in addition to the National Socialists, had followed his lead, including Tom Metzger, leader of the White Aryan Resistance, and Alex Linder, who runs the Vanguard News Network, an online forum for the neo-Nazis.

State health department officials said recently that they were considering condemning Cobb’s property over health code issues related to an outdoor toilet in Cobb’s yard.

Cobb said he would fight the health department in court if necessary. (Reporting by Dave Thompson; Writing by Karen Brooks; Editing by Chris Francescani and Eric Beech)

White supremacists find resistance in North Dakota town

From the Duluth News Tribune

More than 300 protesters marched up this small town’s gravel road Sunday, chanting and carrying signs to rally against a visit by a leader of a white nationalist group and efforts to turn the town of 16 into an all-white enclave.

 

As they walked, more than 20 white nationalist-related flags became visible in front of the home of Craig Cobb, who has bought 12 lots in the town about 75 miles southwest of Bismarck. Cobb has been giving them to other known white supremacists as part of his plan to eventually take over the government of the town.

 

Scott Garman, an organizer of the UnityND protest, yelled into a megaphone as they stood across the road from the town hall and Cobb’s house.

 

“This is not a single-day event. We will be back again and again until you’re gone,” he said.

 

Garman said he couldn’t have been happier with the turnout, with 150 alone from the Standing Rock Reservation.

 

As more protesters took to the microphone, Grant County Sheriff Steve Bay and other law enforcement officials formed a line between the protesters and Cobb’s house.

 

Standing in front of his house, Cobb called the protest, “pure comedy,” although it was a larger group than he expected.

 

He said the group “is not human.”

 

“They are a force of nature that has made a plan to impede on my freedom,” he said.

 

“When we’re in charge here,” Cobb said, “we are going to treat them a lot more humanely and civilly than they have been to us.”

 

Jeff Schoep, the leader of a national white supremacist group who drove from Detroit with other supporters, called the protesters “outside agitators,” as many of them did not have a connection to the town.

 

He said the point of his visit was to show support for Cobb and his plans.

 

“If somebody is going to trample on our rights or our friends’ rights, we’re going to get involved,” he said to a group standing outside Cobb’s house.

 

Schoep said he is proud of Cobb, who “has been doing a great thing.”

 

“With the economic situation in our country, we have a lot of people out of work,” Schoep said. “This is a good opportunity for people to come here and make a better life.”

 

Town hall meeting

 

Schoep, who wrote a letter to Leith Mayor Ryan Schock two weeks ago to notify him about the visit, said he just wanted to meet with Schock and the local residents to answer any questions about Cobb’s efforts and the National Socialist Movement.

 

Schock didn’t respond to the letter. “I don’t have to go down there and argue with him,” he said Sunday, a few blocks from the town hall. “I have 200-300 that can speak for me.”

 

As the meeting kicked off, Schoep and Cobb were greeted with loud resentment from people who filled the old wooden building. The resentment was quickly silenced by Bay and other law enforcement. Within minutes, law enforcement had to remove an elderly man and woman as they continually shouted expletives toward Cobb and Schoep.

 

Schoep, dressed in a black pinstriped suit, opened the meeting by letting them know, “the National Socialist Movement isn’t here to change your way of life.”

 

Schoep and Cobb then fielded over an hour’s worth of questions, including why Cobb tried to keep his plans quiet for months and how they planned to take over the town.

“We would have to do it through the democratic process,” he answered, referring to the normal election process.

Outside the meeting, protesters stayed quiet, waiting for the meeting to finish.

Lillian Jones of Fargo, N.D., a board member with the North Dakota Human Rights Coalition, said nobody wants there to be trouble, “but sometimes something has to be stirred up, and this is something that needs immediate attention.”

“This is something that is contaminating the atmosphere,” she said.

Spectators such as Jim Chyle of Park River also filled the streets. Chyle said his curiosity brought him to town.

“I think people have a right to do what they want to do, but I’m hoping there’s another side to it than the side that’s been getting all the attention,” he said about racist message in Cobb’s plans.

Chase Iron Eyes, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, assured the crowd they will continue to watch Leith to make sure Cobb’s plans are not carried out.

“We are evolved human beings, and I think you know you represent a dying cause,” he yelled. “You’re 30 miles from our (reservation) border, if you think you can come into our territory and threaten our children, you have another thing coming. “

Protesters carried handmade signs, some read “No hate in my state” and, “Don’t let the door KKKick you on the way out.”

As the meeting winded down, the group of protesters outside the town hall sang the national anthem and continued with their chanting.

Law enforcement

Sheriff Bay said he planned to take a proactive approach to Sunday’s meeting, which was evident as soon as someone drove into town. Bay had all the town roads blocked off by metal fences and law enforcement vehicles.

“If something looks like it’s going to happen, we’ll take care of it,” he said earlier in the day.

More than 30 law enforcement officials were in town, including a 14-person team dressed in full riot gear that stood a few blocks from the action.

Leith residents Bobby and Sherrill Harper said they were surprised to see the amount of law enforcement and precautions taken for the protest.

But Bobby Harper, the only African American in Leith, said you can never underestimate violence.

“They are here for a purpose, and I’m glad they are. I don’t want anyone to get hurt,” he said.

‘Test ground’

Asked if Cobb’s plan will work, Schoep said he hopes it does.

“You have to start somewhere. This is sort of a test ground,” he said. “If we are able to get off the ground here, then we can get off the ground in other places.”

Members of the Leith community have started a legal defense fund, and Schock said the city is searching for an attorney in case a legal issue does surface.

As for the protesters, Garman said UnityND has plans not only to thwart Cobb’s efforts, but, “work to confront hate and prejudice across the state.” Garman wouldn’t go into detail but say they are hoping to get businesses to refuse service to the white supremacists.

Supremacists travel to N.D. town to back man’s dream of white enclave

From the Star Tribune

LEITH, N.D. — Members of a white supremacist group plan to visit the small North Dakota town of Leith in support of a man who’s been buying up property there in hopes of developing a white enclave.

The National Socialist Movement planned a town hall meeting Sunday afternoon. Leader Jeff Schoep says in a statement that the trip is “a gesture of goodwill, as we plant the seeds of national socialism in North Dakota.” He says the group wants to support Craig Cobb and ensure Cobb isn’t driven out of the community.

There are plenty of people who dislike the white supremacists’ plans — and not just people who live in Leith. A group called UnityND plans to form a caravan in Bismarck and drive down to Leith to protest Schoep’s group.

North Dakota Town Fights Takeover By White Supremacists

From the International Business Times

Leith, N.D., with a population of only 16, has been in sharp decline for years. While the economy of much of North Dakota has grown because of the recent oil boom, Leith has not experienced the same positive effects as the rest of the state. So why is one man purchasing loads of land throughout the town? It sounds crazy, but it’s all part of a plot to create a white supremacist enclave there.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, a tracker of hate groups both on- and offline, self-described white supremacist and neo-Nazi Paul Craig Cobb has been purchasing land in the town, hoping to establish a white supremacist enclave in the area. Connecting with other neo-Nazis through the Internet, Cobb, 61, has encouraged like-minded white supremacists to hop on the bandwagon.

“Been waiting quite a few months to spring this. Now is the time,” Cobb wrote on the Vanguard News Network. Encouraging other white supremacists to settle in the town, Cobb touted Leith’s benefits to potential neo-Nazi neighbors. “There is water, electricity, satellite internet via Hughes at $50 per month, satellite TV from at least 3 companies, trailers, 5th wheels, campers legal, car [insurance] as little as $141 for 6 months and most importantly — a surfeit of very good paying jobs in two different cities within normal commutable distances,” he wrote.

Grant County, encompassing Leith, is already 97 percent white (while North Dakota is 90 percent white), making it appear to be an ideal place for such a colony to spring up. Cobb doesn’t just want to live around fellow white supremacists, however. He wants them to control the local government, as well.

However, longtime residents of Leith have no desire to see their small town fall under the control of white supremacists. “We need people from across the state to come alongside of us and show support that they don’t believe in what this guy is doing,” Lee Cook, a Leith City Council member, told the Bismarck Tribune last week. “There are a lot of people who could speak up. It’s not tricky. Silence, to me, means that whatever he’s doing is OK.”